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Seyed Amin Kazemi Asl Mohammad Reza Aslani Abdonaser Mohebbi Azam Mokhtari

Abstract

Contagious ecthyma (CE) is a zoonotic skin disease of small ruminants, caused by an epitheliotropic parapoxvirus and has a worldwide distribution with significant economic importance. The objective of this study was to determine clinicopathlogic abnormalities in goats naturally infected with CE. Thirty two goats, 16 affected with CE and 16 normal healthy goats were used in this study. CE was confirmed by histopathology and PCR. Blood samples were collected from jugular veins for hematological and biochemical analysis. The PCV, WBC and neutrophil counts of CE affected goats were significantly higher than those in the unaffected goats (p < 0.05). Serum biochemical analysis revealed significantly higher levels of BUN, glucose, MDA and iron concentrations as well as CK, AST, GGT and catalase activities in CE affected goats than healthy animals (p < 0.05). The serum activity of catalase, SOD and GPx in goats with CE were significantly lower than those in normal goats. Creatinine concentration in serum of goats with CE was significantly lower than that in heathy ones (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in serum total protein, albumin, total and direct bilirubin, and cholesterol concentrations between CE affected and healthy goats. The alterations observed in hematological and biochemical parameters of CE affected goats could be related to weight loss, subnutrition, oxidative stress and pathological changes including inflammation and secondary bacterial infection. These findings could be useful for the management of cases of sheep and goats with CE.

Article Details

Keywords

Contagious ecthyma, Goats, Parapoxvirus, Orf, Clinical pathogy

References
How to Cite
Seyed Amin, K. A., Mohammad Reza, A., Abdonaser, M., & Azam, M. (2019). Hematological and biochemical evaluation of goats naturally infected with contagious ecthyma. Iranian Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology, 10(2), 43-47. https://doi.org/10.22067/veterinary.v2i10.69865
Section
Original Articles